Ice

Ice!  I fully realize you may not wish to see any more of this stuff after a long, long winter, but I am giving ice one last hurrah today before spring.   I promise this post has a happy ending.

This winter I made sure to spend some time down at the lakeshore, despite the chill. The ice volcanoes there were quite impressive this year, due to cold temperatures and high winds.
The graphic here shows how the shelf ice at the lakeshore is formed, how ice volcanoes can be made, and how it’s bad news to fall inside one.

Yikes!


People go on them anyway.

One of the neat things about going down to the lakeshore at Presqu’ile is that it changes every day. The best time for viewing was definitely sunset.

This last image is from two days ago. A Great Blue Heron has arrived back from the south. It does not seem discouraged at all by the icy pond where it has been hunting the last two days. The sky is full of returning birds – Starlings, Red-winged Blackbirds, Crows, and Canada Geese are loudly marking their return. Though I love the spectacular beauty of the winter, I am ready for spring. How about you?

8 Comments:

  1. Nice! Beautiful and interesting ice. Thank you for taking me there. I appreciate your photos and discoveries!

  2. Can I use your illustration to show the dangers of ice volcano’s and ice mounds? That is good illustration. In the 1960’s when I was a young girl, my friend and I were walking along the shoreline east of Cobourg and could hear a dog. It had fallen into an ice volcano and we being about 11 or 12 thought we could get the dog out. It was difficult, as it kept disappearing to the outer edge of the base of the cone. We were finally able to get it out, but if that happened again. I don’t know what I would do, knowing what I know now as an adult. That is a great illustration and is relevant to the season.

  3. Absolutely stunning shots, Leslie! You certainly captured winter!!
    The sunsets are beautiful.

  4. Beautiful photos. I had not realized that there could be danger if one decided to explore an ice volcano.

    Am curious how high the they were.

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